Biggest EDM DJs in the World

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of...

read more
Hiker’s Guide

Hiker’s Guide

i spoke with a friend recently who made a point about the perfect live act being different enough from the artist’s album that it remains interesting, but similar enough that it feels familiar. how do you strike that balance in your live shows? i always run in a...

read more
5 things should know to be a DJ

5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

read more
The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different...

read more
Mutek Review

Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

read more

EVENTS

Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different...

FESTIVAL

5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

mutek es 2015

HEAR talaboman of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel...

HEADLINES

5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

read more

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of...

read more

Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

read more

mutek es 2015

HEAR talaboman of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel...

read more

RECENT POST

5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of...

Hiker’s Guide

i spoke with a friend recently who made a point about the perfect live act being different enough from the artist’s album that it remains interesting, but similar enough that it feels familiar. how do you strike that balance in your live shows? i always run in a...

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different...

LATEST NEWS & UPDATES

5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ.

  1. What is DJing?

The basic job of DJ is to mix or make music which is danceable. The beauty behind DJing is that the DJ can make match his music to the expression of the audience and can make sure each and every one has fun. It is more than about matching and mixing beats. It is about being observant, reactive and empathic.

  1. How do you become a DJ?

Became a DJ

It is not hard to start out being a DJ. But it is hard to stand out. To become a unique DJ you should determine your goals. Learn how to use a mixing software and invest in some DJ equipment soon. Make sure people know you are a DJ and promote yourself and increase your following. You can start off by playing at clubs and parties. There are different kinds of DJs and different specializations. Figure out what kind of a DJ you want to be and start such kind of music.

  1. What are the different types of DJ?

The categories in DJs are- The club DJ is usually the resident DJ of a pub or club, who plays music according to the feel and ambience of club. The performer is the DJ who plays in concerts usually. People come to see the DJ perform. The Radio DJ’s job is to play music on the radio by doing different announcements in between the full-on music curation.

  1. Determine your goals.

The first and the foremost step to be a DJ is to determine your goals and your plan to achieve those goals. To determine your goals it is necessary to have clarity on why you want to be a DJ. The different reasons determine what kind of a DJ you should be. One has to keep in mind that DJing is not a fast path to success unlike the popular belief. It requires hard work, and building yourself from the scratch to be famous all over the world.

  1. Explore different software and learn the basic skills.

There are different software to mix music, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The main industry software are Traktor Pro, Serato Pro and Rekordbox. Learn the basic skills and terms of DJing such as tempo, phase, beatmatching. For the best remixes one should be very observant of the different beats in both the tracks.

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of the top 10 DJs in the world.

  1. Martin Garrix- Martin Garrix is Dutch DJ and record producer. He is ranked number 1 by the top DJ magazine for a couple of years now. Martin Garrix has achieved fame at a young age when he released his widely loved EDM track Animals in 2012. He is the founder of the label STMPD RCRDS.
  2. Dimtri Vegas and Like Mike- Dimtri Vegas and Like Mike are bother from Belgium who came together to be a duo of record producer and DJ. They were ranked number 1 in 2015. The duo started their career early and played in small clubs and worked as radio DJs. Today the duo have concerts all over the world and in major clubs in Ibiza.
  3. Armin Van Buuren- Armin Van buuren is a record producer and DJ from Netherlands and is best known for trance music. He hosts the State of Trance radio show which is broadcasted in over 84 countries on over 100 FM radio stations. He was ranked number 1 by DJ Mag for five times in a row.
  4. Hardwell- Born in 1988, Hardwell or Robbert van de Corput is a DJ, record producer and remixer from Netherlands. He specializes in Electro-house music and was voted the World’s number 1 DJ in 2013.

Dj

  1. Tiesto- Tiesto or Tijs Michiel Verwest is a Dutch DJ and record producer who specializes in house and trance music. He started his music career in 1994 and has founded the label Black Hole Recordings, and hosted a radio show called as “Tiesto’s Club Life”. He was ranked as the number 1 DJ for three consecutive years 2002-2004.
  2. Chainsmokers- The Chainsmokers is an American DJ and production duo who started their career in 2012. The Chainsmokers consists of Alex Pall and Andrew Taggart. They gained their popularity with their record-breaking song #Selfie
  3. David Guetta- Considered as one of the oldest and most experienced DJ, David Guetta started his career in 1984. He was voted as the number one DJ in 2011, and sold over nine million albums and thrirty million singles.
  4. Afrojack- Afrojack or Nick van de Wall is a DJ,record producer and remixer from Netherlands. He founded Wall recording recording label and released his first album through it.
  5. Steve Aoki- A Dj from Florida Steve Hiroyuki Aoki is a Dj and record producer who started his musical career 1996. He released four albums till date and has featured in several other songs. He specializes in hip hop, electro music, dubstep and trap.
  6. Marshmello- Marshmello or Christopher Comstock is a DJ from Pennsylvania. He frist gained popularity by remixing ther songs and collaborated with several other musicians later. He specializes in future bass, electronic, progressive house and trap.

Hiker’s Guide

i spoke with a friend recently who made a point about the perfect live act being different enough from the artist’s album that it remains interesting, but similar enough that it feels familiar. how do you strike that balance in your live shows?

i always run in a circle, starting with the attempt to reproduce existing tracks and then during the evolution of my sets, move away from that into more improvised structures. seems to be a natural process for me; the more familiar i get with my own material the more i have the confidence to question the existing structures and come up with new way to arrange the same basic building blocks. my best live performances usually happen when i am already almost bored by my own material. then there is that flow of confidence from which i can depart at any time into more radical territory.

in hitchhiker, you make a similar point about exceeding expectations. is the threat of underperforming a motivator for you, creatively — as in, do you still feel like you have something to prove?

i am very often ridiculously insecure about my work, and as much as i dislike this notion of myself, it definitely forces me to move on constantly to get better. it only works on a long run because there are moments in between where i am surprised by the quality of what i can achieve, too. without the positive feedback i would not find the energy to do anything.

are the expectations you set for yourself sometimes more important than the ones set by your listeners?

yes. it also depends on who exactly states expectations and for what reason. at the end of the day, it matters that i do what i feel is the right thing, and not what a promoter or journalist or drunken raver asks for. however, input from friends or people whose intelligence and artistic integrity impresses me is valuable and might have an influence on what i do.

in this conversation that i mentioned, the topic of legacy came up; the idea that a popular pioneering artist’s legacy as world-changing or life-altering often makes it so that he can’t live up to that standard. would you agree? as an artist, does that worry you?

that question is as old as art itself! of course it bothers every single creative person. the topic would be worth a whole book in itself! the best strategy to cope with this is to understand that creating something that has meaning beyond the time of creation is an extraordinary gift and nothing to take for granted. thus, instead of being frustrated about not delivering a revolution with every single song, one should be happy about the previous achievement and simply do what one likes to do most.

that’s great advice. 

the biggest danger comes here again from trying too hard to fulfill expectations. the reason for my own initial success very often was the complete ignorance of expectations: “yeah, i know what i am doing is not music, but i like it!” oh, twenty years later every former rock ‘n roll guitar player is including elements of that stuff in their music — great! that’s the state of mind i’d like to suggest for dealing with such questions. only from such a perspective is there a chance to achieve something unique. and this is reflected back in so many artists’ careers: initial success, period of less successful attempts to keep up with the expectations, doing something more personal again and often enough becoming recognized for that, too. and sometimes only post-mortem, unfortunately.

surprise your audience

should every show be different, or is that a sign of inconsistency? where do we draw the line?

every show is different even if you play back a tape! every show should be an attempt to make it as good as possible, that’s what counts. inconsistency, on the other hand, doesn’t worry me. after all, if what i do as an artist is personal, what ever i do will shine through. i think for me the keyword would be integrity.

does that change depending on whether you’re the performer or the listener?

no. do i feel as an audience member, that someone tried the best to give me an experience, or is it all done lukewarm? if i get the impression that no one cared about essential details of a performance, i feel betrayed. but what these details are can be so different from situation to situation. if i go to a basement club listening to a hardcore noise act, that essential detail can be as simple as the deliberate absence of soft drink company branded fridges in the bar.

what’s been the most unexpected surprise you’ve encountered during a live performance, whether your own or someone else’s?

too many to count, but one which will stick forever did happen during the very first monolake live set in the mid 1990s. we played at a small club in berlin, with our equipment set up right at the bar. gerhard behles was operating a synthesizer, completely focused, and i was working with some other gear. suddenly a person approaches gerhard, requesting two beers. gerhard, who used to work in a bar himself, completely on autopilot just turned back, opened the fridge, grabbed the beers and handed them over to the guy, then continued playing! one day i want to see this as a movie scene…

that’s hilarious. with live performance i’m sure there are a lot of surprises like those, but how does this rule work with things like sound installations?

very often a substitute for time in music is space in installation art. you come to a museum and get one angle on a work, then you continue walking around and perceive the same work from a different perspective and it changes the experience completely. that’s one of the things i love about installations, that the the visitor can create their own compositions by simply walking around with their eyes and ears open.

as someone who has been involved in dance music for so long, do you find that you’ve become completely jaded or is it still possible for you to be surprised or blown-away?

it takes more to surprise me, but it still happens and that will never change. there are just too many people out there doing amazing stuff!

do you believe in humour in electronic music? i found that your lumière II show had a lot of lighthearted or playful moments in terms of how the visuals and lasers interacted.

i have been told i am a humorous person, so i guess it is important for me. the most serious people i know are also the ones who usually have a good sense of humor. how could i make something that is not at times lighthearted? it would not make me happy! after all, and despite the technical effort, at the end it is just sound waves and lasers with no other purpose than entertaining my audience. a lumière show does not change the world: it does not help fight poverty, it does not have a political message. however, if it can make people happy, there is a chance that those people go out of it, with more energy to fight what ever they need to fight for. and suddenly it becomes essential again.

choose a good space

how does space affect sound? does our understanding of music change depending on where we hear it?

it totally does. the separation of music and space is artificial and only a development since the invention of storage media. thousands of years before that music always did happen is specific spaces that suited the purpose. churches, living rooms, theatres, ritual spaces, outdoors, etc. a proper techno event has to happen in an environment that is rough and reverberant, not in a classical concert hall with a seated audience. and a morton feldman piano piece is not the ideal music for a beach bar.

what about for sound installations? how would, for example, your studies for thunderinstallation change if the audience was (hypothetically) in a cloud instead of sitting on rocks in mexico?

(laughs) i would love to perform in a cloud! i usually try to get as much information about a performance space beforehand and then decide based on this knowledge how to perform best. the mexico scenario is a good example, though. i was scheduled to play a monolake set there. but when i arrived i decided that i have a far more exciting offer to make than just a club set, and with the help of the super nice PA person, nicolas klau, we managed to set up a surround sound system in a few hours before the show. that effort totally paid off for everyone. one of the most remarkable shows i’ve had in the last 25 years.

is space something you consider when you’re building or creating a track, or is it only relevant when you’re playing live?

it depends. some of my works are created with specific types of concert situations in mind, and when ever i make a monolake track i envision how it would feel like to listen to it at a space like berghain.

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different ways to move your audience. and henke should know. he has more than two decades of experience in the electronic music industry under his belt, not only as a producer and artist but likewise as the co-founder and developer of ableton.

his live performances — whether under his own name or as part of cutting-edge electronic act, monolake —  have brought him everywhere from the stages of mutek montreal or unsound poland, to the jagged rock cliffs of mexico or the empty airport hangars of france, to the dripping concrete walled nightclubs of his native germany. he works with anything and everything; lasers, kinetic light objects, field recordings, drum kits, helium balloons, computers, networking software. there is no limit to what henke can turn into music.

a few years after live performance in the age of supercomputing, henke rewrote the essay as a hitch hiker’s guide. the age of supercomputing, it seemed, had caught up with him. digital publication began calling for short, punctuated pieces; so henke obliged. written with a wink of irony, henke broke the essay down into accessible, easy to understand sections with titles like “play stuff the audience knows,” and “make sure it sounds great.” for our littlecity exclusive interview, i took a leaf from henke’s book: herewith you’ll find the hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke, an exploration of his work and values using the same sections as his pervasive essay.

defining good

in your hitchhiker’s guide to live performance, you wrote, “if what we deliver as performers shall be perceived as good, we first need to find out what that highly subjective notion of good could stand for.” what does “good” mean to you?

i’d like to do things that touch people on an emotional level. i can appreciate great conceptual pieces of art, but when it comes to my own works i want to achieve a mental state that is decoupled from a rational or technical perspective.

so, does the meaning of “good” change depending on whether you’re the listener or the performer?

when performing i am much more critical about details. as a listener i am way more forgiving, experiencing more at the overall picture and judging the work by that overall experience.

play stuff the audience knows

how does “fandom” benefit or hinder your live performances? is it harder to play for an audience that is completely new to your work?

quite the opposite! if there are no expectations there is a much more open minded starting point. if you do not know an artist there is no history, no context, no comparison. all that counts is the now. some of the most precious moments i’ve had with music, cinema, art, literature took place when being confronted with something i did not choose, and had no idea what to expect of it. i once played in madrid at a museum on a sunday afternoon, and after the concert and old lady came to me and talked to me very agitated in spanish. i was worried that she would complain about the horrible noises i made, but then someone started translating and it turned out the lady was totally amazed and wanted to know where to buy my music! (laughs)

expect the unexpected! does live performance have a recipe? 

it depends very much on the specific type of performance. i have a different strategy for a monolake club set, a robert henke drone piece or the lumière project.

but does that idea of a strategy contradict the meaning of “live?” 

in general, “live” implies to me that something special happens at a given moment together with the audience. coming back to the question about ‘good’ performance, this means for me that something has to happen during the performance which makes it a unique and remarkable experience. this can absolutely include such extremes as a perfect playback of a pre-recorded show under acoustic and technical conditions that exceed what i can experience at home, or a totally improvised anarchist wall of noise created by ten people with modular synthesizers or guitars.

in hitchhiker, you wrote that, “nothing can go wrong with playing stuff the audience knows.” do you still believe that?

(laughs) that was already ironic when i wrote it! i wrote that the best strategy is to play songs the audience knows, but in reality that only works if there is some add on value which creates the sensation of uniqueness and ideally of interaction between audience and performer.

Mutek Review

nootak

nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up by a triangle of poles. their live set was an arresting display of experimental and techno, but it was their visuals that stole the show. beams of white light projected from behind sent dynamic laser-like images to every side of the prism; minimalist and unique, just like their music.

architecture

look up! look wayyy up. arguably the most interesting part of travelling to a new city is taking in the incredible architecture. particularly when it’s as stunning as the array of architecture in barcelona. we saw everything from intricate gothic churches to modernist art nouveau from antoni gaudi. even mutek’s main hub, the convent st agusti, was a beautiful taste of catalonian history, having been constructed in the 1350s and repurposed today as a civic center.

TASTE

coffee

nothing new there, but there is certainly something to be said about drinking a cafe con leche while wandering through the streets of barcelona in the sunshine, or sitting across from the half-built sagrada familia with a poorly rolled cigarette and an espresso. see also: the beneficial effects of coffee on your hangover when you wake up and have to be presentable for an interview in less than an hour.

red wine

no, we most certainly did not drink the best red wine available in spain. in fact, at one point, we bought a bottle from a sketchy, aggressive young man who was selling after hours beers in the middle of the street at 6 in the morning. the wine, however, was great. well, it was drinkable. or well, we drank it, i dunno.

tapas

after overcoming our hunger-anger pains and searching on the wrong street for a tapas restaurant that came highly recommended for 20 minutes, we settled on a little place with bad lighting and a good menu. we had everything from peppers padron and mussels to artisanal goat cheese and seafood salad and i am now considering moving to spain based on tapas alone.

FEEL

chills

this is by no means an uncommon feeling for me. it’s something known as le frisson; the goosebumps you get when some outside stimuli really makes you feel. maybe you’ve felt them at the touch of your lover, during a really good film, or at a sports game, but in fact, the most common way to experience a frisson is through music. it is a beautifully unsettling feeling, and for me, it happens not only when the music is that good but when the moment is that perfect. at mutek, it was standing on the top balcony looking down on an insatiable crowd during talaboman. their last 20 minutes was utter magic, and i get chills just thinking back on it.

sunshine

i’m telling the truth when i say that berlin’s greys for days doesn’t bother me that much. it’s only when we get a sliver of sunshine in the very early morning that i even remember to miss the sun. i didn’t even bring sunnies when i went to krakow last month because i honestly forgot that the sun existed. not so in barcelona. despite torrential downpours on the first day, we had beautiful weather the rest of the trip and the feeling of sunshine on my skin was a welcome antidote to the berlin grey skies, and a wink at the upcoming summer.

bass

where would a music festival be without bass? although many of the clubs had decent soundsystems, it was, perhaps surprisingly, the audio at teatre barts that threw down the most moving sound. during performances from maotik and metametrik, herman kolgen, and robert henke, the thunder of the bass and the quiver of the highs was so dazzlingly present that you vibrated in your seat. and for the rest of the night.

mutek es 2015

HEAR

talaboman

of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel boman and john talabot followed up for magic mountain high, and the pair was an unstoppable hybrid. perfect chemistry, stellar track selection mixed with a resounding knowledge of what the crowd was hungry for. they dropped in numbers from their solo acts as well as pieces from their joint sideral release.

birdsmakingmachine

by contrast, birdsmakingmachine was the act i was by far the most excited for. it’s always a risk getting your hopes up that high — but rarely does an artist deliver quite as profoundly as diego “pior” martin. although birds is an artist collective, when playing live, it’s pior that takes the stage. his live at moog club on the wednesday was everything i hoped it would be: danceable, funked out, textural min tech that was somehow still in touch with pior’s argentinian roots. an unbelievable set that made up for the rowdiness of a young distracted crowd.

max graef and kickflip mike

playing out for the start of the friday night at nitsa club, these two were the perfect warm up. though both artists are from berlin, they don’t play with the typical berlin personality; there’s no favouritism or purism here, every genre gets dealt a fair hand. their set moved from techno to bass with ease, pulling in references of house and groovy minimal. on point.

reykjavik 606

by the time the free show at the fabrica estrella damm rolled around on saturday, it’s safe to say i was tired. we had walked 45 minutes to get to the venue, but reykjavik 606 was bringing everyone back to life. although seemingly named for the city in iceland, this trio is from spain and brought it down like only a local act could: beats that told stories paired up with interesting, narrative-like visuals, all played out from behind a giant screen so that the show really did speak for itself.

woulg

woulg is a canadian artist, and a live audio/visual act who played out after reykjavik at estrella damm, treading somewhere between techno and broken down experimental. stripped back visuals in black and white were complemented by the greyness of his music; that’s not to say that it was dull, rather that it was impactful without having sharp edges. seamless transitions, interesting textures, and intricate infusions of energy that had me dancing despite my legs being made of concrete.

magic mountain high

i debated for a minute on where to place these guys. “see” because their chemistry on stage was unrivalled at this festival? watching them was without a doubt a great pleasure, but “hear” won out because their sound was something else. not exactly what i’d expected based on my knowledge of move d; their set had a more visceral appeal, something entirely low-key or understated. their live felt perfectly spontaneous, filled in with guitar riffs and smokey atmosphere. an altogether excellent use of space and sound; a nod to the charming nature of their moniker.

SMELL

 bakeries

you would think that living in a city where bread is like the number one thing that people love outside of techno would make me immune to the deliciousness of bakery smells, but… you know me. our walks through barcelona’s old town were a chorus of “mmmmm,” constantly interrupted with us stopping to press our faces against the windows of every patisserie, churro stand, bakery, and cafe.

the seaside

something about the way that living in a city like berlin (or even montreal) gets you accustomed to the scent and taste of the urban landscape. it is truly an experience to walk five minutes from your apartment and arrive at port vell on the mediterranean sea, to smell this kind of organic environment: fresh air, salt water…

twin drive

although the primary focus for mutek is the music, the fact that almost every act is accompanied by unparalleled visuals is a really crucial element to the festival’s success. although we saw our fair share of standard bright green linear laser light shows that looked like an electrocardiogram, we also saw some very innovative performances. case in point: twin drive, who played at the convent st agusti on friday. granted, i wasn’t particularly a fan of the duo’s sound, their take on visuals was just the right kind of weird. using nothing more than a slide projector, francesca banchelli presented plain washes of colour and old photographs manipulated by focusing/unfocusing the image, switching slides, and tangible efforts like her hair or hands in the shot. it was incredibly imaginative and lent a nostalgic lens to their performance.

robert henke

when german a/v artist and engineer robert henke played mutek montreal, i reluctantly had to miss his set because of work. the insurmountable good things i heard about his set have haunted me ever since. we sat down at teatre barts to experience his show which, at over an hour long, could have been tedious, but was unsurprisingly fantastic. the relationship between visuals and music was undeniably precise: lights and lasers programmed to react to audio frequencies. the actual aesthetic of the lights was somehow full of personality, and there was often something quite witty about how the lights interacted with the sound — a flurry of pink lines would disappear to be replaced by a looming red square at the drop of a beat, or rings of purple light would fly from the center of the screen, bouncing off one another before hitting the floor.

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Biggest EDM DJs in the World

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Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

mutek es 2015

HEAR talaboman of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel...

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5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of...

Hiker’s Guide

i spoke with a friend recently who made a point about the perfect live act being different enough from the artist’s album that it remains interesting, but similar enough that it feels familiar. how do you strike that balance in your live shows? i always run in a...

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different...

Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

mutek es 2015

HEAR talaboman of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel...

Mariana F. Clark

Mariana is a V-Moda sponsored audiophile.She works at Audeze as a sound engineer. 
She likes playing the guitar and creating music which appeals to ref sound fanatics.

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5 things should know to be a DJ

With rise of EDM or Electronic Dance Music, the demand for being a DJ is also rising. With so many DJ schools coming up and so many different ways to be a DJ, it might get confusing. So here are five things you must know to be a DJ. What is DJing? The basic job of DJ...

Biggest EDM DJs in the World

EDM or Electronic Dance Music is a popular made and mixed using electronically created tune. It is a popular genre of music among the youngsters and is used in clubs and danced parties. The world of EDM is the fastest growing music genre today and here is a list of...

Hiker’s Guide

i spoke with a friend recently who made a point about the perfect live act being different enough from the artist’s album that it remains interesting, but similar enough that it feels familiar. how do you strike that balance in your live shows? i always run in a...

The hitch hiker’s guide to robert henke

In 2008 a berlin-based producer, composer, sound engineer, and installation artist named robert henke wrote an essay entitled live performance in the age of supercomputing. it was a two-part piece that detailed the subtleties of live performance, and the different...

Mutek Review

nootak nonotak, a half french, half japanese duo, played at the institut francais in a basement theater, one of the festival’s smaller venues. their set up was unique in and of itself; they played inside a prism constructed out of a set of translucent screens held up...

mutek es 2015

HEAR talaboman of the acts i was most excited to see, talaboman was the one i was least excited for, if that makes sense. maybe going in with mediocre expectations is the best advice, because talaboman truly blew me away. energy was already high at nitsa club as axel...